Let the Lady Speak: Kamala Harris Dealing with “Manterruption”

by Carmen Woodruff
Carmen Woodruff

Image source: ABC News

Mr. Vice President, I’m speaking…I’m speaking…

We all heard it. And then we heard it again.

My eyes bulged, both lips pursed together in shock. He looked at her. She looked back at him, unapologetically and firm, one might even say with a twinkle in her eye. Stoic, he sought some sort of out. His body held still but his bloodshot pupil told a frantic narrative. Lashes were outstretched for a floatation device.

Something. Anything. Anyone!

His functioning eyeball darted towards the other lady in the room as he accused his opponent of refuting questions, mansplaining how a debate should be conducted despite U.S. debate protocol set forth by no other than honest Abe in 1858 – the same Abe touted for tying, “possibly” our current leader’s commitment to racial equality.

Deep breaths.

To my relief, the overall gist was a bit more refined than the presidential train wreck we witnessed the week prior. Random thoughts as the debate goes on. Is he doodling on his notepad? Did I remember to turn on the dryer? Kamala’s hair is looking glam! Roe vs. Wade. Affordable Care Act. When’s the next girls’ Zoom? COVID. How much weight have I gained in quarantine? Vaccines. When will this madness end? Yes, stay focused and complete your thoughts, Senator!

Buzzz-zzzzt!

What on earth is that on his head? Let’s call her Fiona. Justice RBG, you are a hoot! Big Gretch, maybe? Is this your doing? Well, whoever sent her, I’m here for it! I think we all are! Needless to say, the remainder of the debate and the rest of my night was lit! I followed Fiona on Twitter, tuned into her Instagram LIVE, purchased some merch and stayed up to meet and greet with her on all of the late night shows.

I even bought a blue swatter in the morning to exercise my right for “TRUTH over flies!” All jokes aside, I was proud to witness the first-ever African-American female candidate make history in a country with a tumultuous past and questionable progress. Moral of the story: let the lady speak. Let your voice be heard. No exceptions.

Love and light to you, Senator Harris. We’re rooting for you and listening, waiting our turn to chime in!

In the meantime, here are some “say it loud” suggestions for “speaking” as a lady:

  1. Hold the milk and cookies in the office, Mom! Such a kind gesture to bring in treats for colleagues but maybe not the best for those of us who work in male-dominated professions. Instead, bring poise, positivity and productivity.
  2. Come to business meetings prepared with questions and solutions. Speak up and let your opinion be heard; follow Kamala’s example of fierceness and optimism. Take notes and contribute, always.
  3. Educate yourself as much as possible. As my grandmother always said, no one can take it away from you. And though we face economic and salary disparities based on gender, credentials keep us qualified and viable for greater opportunity. We may work twice as hard but ultimately we arise as better and not bitter.
  4. Make your mark in your community. It is beyond feasible to get involved in some way in this presidential election. Phone banks, video calls, text campaigns, social media streams. Research and pinpoint the best option for yourself and your family/friends.
  5. Vote. Cast your ballot and do it early. Don’t be swayed or intimidated by gerrymandering tactics.

And finally, smile. Take good care of yourself as we navigate these choppy waters of today’s uncertain reality. Do something you’re proud of every day, even if it’s making your bed or getting dressed. Reach out to an old friend. Give yourself a mani/pedi. Go on a walk. These are the final days of warmth and mild weather for those of us in colder climates.

I have spoken; now, “stand back and stand by” for my next article!

Feminism

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